Address: Uluru Centre, Dunmore Rd, Waterford, County Waterford

FAQ's

Q1. I think my eye sight is fine. Do I still require an eye examination?

A: YES! By professionally examining your eyes, our highly trained Optometrists will be able to detect early signs of various life and sight-threatening diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. Together with other tests, we can also detect neurological disease and glaucoma, a potentially blinding disease if left untreated. Early detection and prevention are crucial to the successful treatment of these diseases. It is recommended that young, healthy individuals have their eye examined regularly.

Q2. MEDICAL CARD CLAIM

A: Medical card holders are entitled to free sight tests and free spectacles. Patients must assess their eligability to claim before the sight test. Please call in and complete a medical card applicatoin form. We will gladly post it to the SEHB for you. Once approved the SEHB will post the form back to you and you are free to arrange your appointment. You are allowed to claim on your medical card every TWO YEARS. You may claim in under two years if you have medical grounds to have a new sight test. Nolke Opticians will have to write an explanitory note to the health board to get this approval.

Q3. What does my eye examination include?

A: All comprehensive eye examinations are performed by our Optometrist . The examination not only determines your prescription, but it also aids the Optometrist in detecting conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, retinal and corneal disorders. The examination also includes cataract and glaucoma screening.

Q4. How often should I have my eyes checked?

A: It can be different for each person but as long as your eyes are healthy, a general comprehensive eye examination is recommended every one to two years. Contact lens wearers should be checked yearly to ensure the cornea and anterior/front part of the eye stays healthy.

Q5. What is refractive error?

A: Myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism are different types of eye'focusing' disorders, or refractive errors. In the normal eye, light enters through the front of the eye at the cornea and is directed to a single point at the back of the eye on the retina. In a 'short-sighted' eye with a refractive error, the light is not focused to a single point at the back of the eye but in front of the retina. This is known as myopia or near-sightedness. When the light is directed to a point behind the retina, the refraction error is known as hyperopia or far-sightedness. The refractive error known as astigmatism occurs when the light is sent to two or more points either behind, in front of or on the retina.

Q6. What is Farsightedness and what is Nearsightedness?

A: Farsightedness, also known as hyperopia, is a visual condition where light is not properly focused on the retina at the back of the eye. Distant objects may appear clear, but near objects may appear blurry. Some signs of farsightedness include eye strain, fatigue or headaches after close work, aching or burning eyes, or difficulty maintaining a clear focus of near objects.

If you or your child have experienced these signs, a comprehensive eye examination by your Optician can test for farsightedness. Eyeglasses or contact lenses can correct farsightedness by altering the way light falls on the back of the eye.

Nearsightedness, also known as myopia, is a visual condition where light is not focused on the back of the eye. Distant objects appear blurry, but near objects appear clear. Nearsightedness is very common. There is some evidence that nearsightedness is caused by too much near work especially at a young age. Nearsightedness is usually first found in school age children, especially while children are growing. Signs of nearsightedness include trouble seeing the chalkboard in school or difficulty seeing distant objects like a TV.

If you or your child have experienced these signs, a comprehensive eye examination by your Optometrist can test for nearsightedness. Eyeglasses or contact lenses can correct nearsightedness by altering the way light falls on the back of the eye. You may only have to wear the optical correction for distant activities, such as watching movies.